Undergraduate Catalog 2021-2022

Department of Folk Studies and Anthropology

Dr. Darlene Applegate, Head
Email: Darlene.Applegate@wku.edu

Ivan Wilson Center for Fine Arts, Room 237
Phone: (270) 745-6549; Fax: (270) 745-6889
Website: https://www.wku.edu/fsa

What is folklore? When you think about folklore, do you think about fairy tales, quilts, dulcimers, and log cabins? Folklore does include these things, but folklore also includes food customs, jokes, holiday customs, vernacular architecture, folk art, body art, memes, cosplay, urban legends, supernatural stories, bathroom graffiti … and so much more. Folklore is informal traditional culture. It is the art of everyday life. It is our customs, our beliefs, our stories, our worldview, and how we communicate. In fact, it’s often so close to us we don’t even notice it’s there—which is precisely why it’s so important.

What is anthropology? Anthropology is the holistic study of human culture and biology in any geographic place or time period. Anthropologists study topics as diverse as technology, foodways and subsistence, diet and nutrition, housing and settlement, economic systems, educational systems, kinship and social organization, political organization, gender and social identity, religion and belief systems, language, art and other forms of expressive culture, culture change and globalization, evolution and adaptation, health and disease, human genetics, growth and development, demography, and non-human primates like chimpanzees. Anthropologists conduct research in the field and in the laboratory. 

Academic Programs

The programs and coursework of the Department of Folk Studies and Anthropology provide WKU students and the University constituency with the training, intellectual tools, and resources to understand the cultural and biological dimensions of humankind in terms of the myriad shaping factors addressed in our respective disciplines. Although the disciplines of anthropology and folk studies are distinct, we share the University’s commitment to excellence in teaching, research, and public service, recognizing that this mission continues to evolve in response to regional, national, and global change.

The undergraduate and graduate programs in folk studies stress the examination of traditional expressive culture as a key to understanding human experience. The discipline of folklore has close affinities with literature, anthropology, sociology, history, geography, linguistics, philosophy, ethnomusicology, and psychology. The folk studies program integrates humanistic and social scientific perspectives on culture with pragmatic skills needed for professional involvement in research or for a variety of fields of employment such as public and applied folklore, historic preservation, cultural resource management, and museum work.

The department offers an undergraduate minor in folklore in order to provide students with opportunities to enrich their general knowledge of the folk traditions and customs of specific societies and culture areas and to develop greater understanding of related forms of human thought and expression.

The anthropology program at Western Kentucky University offers students a cohesive program of study that enriches their knowledge of human culture and biology, develops their cross-cultural perspectives, and prepares them for a variety of careers. In particular, the program provides opportunities for students to study the interaction of culture and biology, both in contemporary societies as well as in the archaeological and evolutionary past. The anthropology major and minor curricula prepare students for graduate studies and employment in cultural anthropology, biological anthropology, archaeology, linguistic anthropology, applied anthropology, cultural resource management, and related fields. Anthropology enriches the study of history, folklore, religion, languages, biological and physical sciences, and other social sciences. The anthropology program maintains extensive archaeological, biological, and cultural collections at the Anthropology Laboratory. The anthropology program also houses the state-of-the-art Ethnographic Visual Production Lab with digital audio and video recorders and cameras, virtual reality equipment, and editing stations.

When planning programs of study in this department, students should be aware of the University’s academic requirements and regulations contained in this catalog in the chapter “Academic Information.” Specific attention should be given to the subsections in the chapter entitled (a) Academic Programs, (b) Colonnade Requirements, and (c) Academic Requirements and Regulations. Students should be aware that some academic programs may require additional scholastic regulations and standards not specified in the catalog. To obtain a copy of these regulations, students should contact the Department Head.

JUMP Program

The Folk Studies Joint Undergraduate-Master’s Program (JUMP) offers highly qualified and motivated students the opportunity to complete a Bachelor’s degree and a Master’s degree in an accelerated time frame. Qualified students who have been admitted to the JUMP program may begin taking graduate courses in folk studies as early as their junior year and can then apply for admission to the MA Program in Folk Studies. JUMP students are NOT required to be Folklore minors.

Why Study Folklore and Anthropology?

The folklorist’s skills in listening, collaboration, and analytical thinking are valuable skills for a wide variety of jobs. With a folklore minor, you’ll develop outstanding skills for communicating across cultural groups as you conduct ethnographic fieldwork. You’ll learn how to do multimedia production as you curate your fieldwork data for new audiences. And you’ll learn how to work collaboratively with a diverse range of community partners. These are the skills 21st century employers seek. According to a survey of recent graduates, 73% of our undergraduate folklore minors were employed and 17% went on to graduate programs. Our graduates are public folklorists, museum curators, educators, preservationists, film producers, professors, and even intelligence analysts.

Training in anthropology promotes cultural awareness and enhances critical thinking, data collection and analysis, and creative problem-solving skills. Our students are actively engaged in research, extracurricular activities, public education, and community service, gaining valuable experience in preparation for careers and advanced studies. According to a recent survey of our anthropology graduates, 74% were employed and 21% progressed on to graduate school. Our former students are working in contract archaeology, cultural resource management, museums, medical anthropology, visual media, international education, the non-profit sector, and other exciting areas.

Public Outreach Programs

The department is proud to house two award-winning public outreach programs. Besides serving diverse communities across the Commonwealth, the programs afford our students with opportunities to gain practical hands-on experience in public folklore and applied anthropology.

For over 30 years the Kentucky Folklife Program (KFP) has been dedicated to the mission of documenting, presenting, and conserving the diverse traditional culture and heritage of the Commonwealth. Founded in 1989 as an inter-agency partnership between the Kentucky Historical Society and Kentucky Arts Council, KFP moved to its current home in the department in 2012. Physically located in the Pioneer Log Cabin on WKU’s main campus, KFP remains focused on practical folklife and traditional arts projects as we continue to understand the evolving needs of local constituents throughout Kentucky, those who have a crucial stake in documenting the folk traditions of their regions. With our vantage point at WKU, KFP is always exploring exciting and innovative partnership opportunities with other organizations, universities, and folklife programs throughout the nation. Examples of KFP projects and programming since moving to WKU include the Bosnian oral history project, Folklorists in the Park program, Pioneer Log Cabin concert series and jams, and Southcentral Kentucky Musical Legacy project.

Founded in 1995, the mission of the Kentucky Archaeological Survey (KAS) is to provide services to state and federal agencies, work with private landowners to protect archaeological sites, and educate the public about Kentucky's rich archaeological heritage. KAS works with local governments and non-profit organizations on diverse initiatives, including educational projects that involve grade-school children and civic groups who participate in ongoing archaeological research. KAS undertakes a variety of projects throughout Kentucky. Some are conducted in advance of construction by government agencies, while others are conducted to identify sites on public lands, so that agencies can be better stewards. Examples of projects are the Old Frankfort Cemetery relocation, survey of historic farmsteads in the Bluegrass, Building Blocks of History program at Riverside–The Farnsley-Moreman Landing, and Kentucky Archaeology video and booklet series.

Faculty

Professor

Darlene A. Applegate PhD (Anthropology), The Ohio State University Main Campus, 1997

Associate Professor

Timothy H. Evans PhD (American Studies, Folklore), Indiana University-Bloomington, 1995

Ann K. Ferrell PhD (English), The Ohio State University Main Campus, 2009

Kate G. Horigan PhD (English, Interdisciplinary Specialization in Folklore), The Ohio State University Main Campus, 2013

Jean-Luc Houle PhD (Anthropology, Archeology), University of Pitts Pittsburgh Camp, 2010

Kathryn A. Hudepohl PhD (Anthropology), Tulane University, 2002

Assistant Professor

Tim W. Frandy PhD (Scandinavian Studies, Folklore), University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2013

Angie A. Stinnett PhD (Anthropology), University of Arizona, 2014

Clinical Assistant Professor

Brent A. Bjorkman MA (Folk Studies), Western Kentucky University, 1998

Professional Staff

Janie-Rice Brother MA (Architectural Historian, Kentucky Archaeological Survey), University of Kentucky, 2009
Justin N. Carlson PhD (Project Director, Kentucky Archaeological Survey), University of Kentucky, 2019
Joel Chapman MA (Folklife Specialist, Kentucky Folklife Program), Western Kentucky University, 2019
A. Gwynn Henderson PhD (Education Director, Kentucky Archaeological Survey), University of Kentucky, 1998
Bruce L. Manzano, MA (Project Archaeologist/Faunal Analyst, Kentucky Archaeological Survey), University of Tennessee, 1986
David Pollack PhD (Director, Kentucky Archaeological Survey), University of Kentucky, 1998
Lori C. Stahlgren, MA (Project Archaeologist, Kentucky Archaeological Survey), Northern Arizona University, 1999
M. Jay Stottman PhD (Assistant Director, Kentucky Archaeological Survey), University of Kentucky, 2016

Anthropology (ANTH)

ANTH 120    Introduction to Cultural Anthropology    3 Hours

Introduction to the cross-cultural study of human behavior and society. Topics normally include environment and food, economics, social and political organization, marriage and family, culture and personality, religion, social movements, and social change. Colonnade/Statewide General Education Code E-SB | SB

Recent Term(s) Offered: spring 2019; summer 2019; fall 2019; spring 2020; fall 2020; spring 2021; fall 2021

ANTH 125    Introduction to Biological Anthropology    3 Hours

Introduction to primatology, human origins and evolution, modern human biological variation, and other topics of biological anthropology, emphasizing biological adaptations within the framework of evolutionary theory.

Recent Term(s) Offered: fall 2019; fall 2021

ANTH 130    Introduction to Archaeology    3 Hours

Introduction to the scientific study of the archaeological record, emphasizing location methods, recovery methods, dating methods, archaeological classification, and interpretative models. Colonnade/Statewide General Education Code E-SB | SB

Recent Term(s) Offered: spring 2019; fall 2019; spring 2020; fall 2020; spring 2021; fall 2021

ANTH 135    Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology    3 Hours

Introduction to the study of the relations among language, culture, and society. Topics include language origins and history, language and gender, multilingualism, verbal art, and applied linguistic anthropology.

Recent Term(s) Offered: spring 2019; spring 2020; spring 2021

ANTH 300    Forensic Anthropology    3 Hours

Analysis of human skeletal remains and other evidence in a medicolegal context, emphasizing bone identification, race and sex determination, age and stature estimation, trauma and pathology assessment, and taphonomy evaluation.

Prerequisite(s): (ANTH 125 or BIOL 131)

Recent Term(s) Offered: spring 2019; spring 2021

ANTH 305    Paleoanthropology: Human Origins and Evolution    3 Hours

Scientific examination of the origins and biocultural evolution of humans, emphasizing evolutionary theory, evidence for human evolution, long-term trends, important fossil finds and sites, taxonomic classifications, and phylogenetic relationships. Colonnade/Statewide General Education Code K-SY

Prerequisite(s): (ANTH 130 or BIOL 113 or BIOL 131 or GEOL 112) and 21 hours of Foundations and Explorations Courses, or junior status

Recent Term(s) Offered: fall 2020

ANTH 316    The Archaeology of Environmental Change    3 Hours

The archaeological study of the impact of the environment on humans and of humans on the environment. Colonnade/Statewide General Education Code K-LG

Prerequisite(s): 21 hours of Foundations and Explorations Courses, or junior status

Recent Term(s) Offered: spring 2019; fall 2019; fall 2020; spring 2021; fall 2021

ANTH 318    The Archaeologist Looks at Death    3 Hours

Theories, concepts, and methodologies of the anthropological and archaeological study of death and burial.

Recent Term(s) Offered: None

ANTH 333    The Archaeology of Ancient China    3 Hours

Culture-historical overview of Ancient China from the Paleolithic to the Qin Empire focusing on major anthropological themes in Chinese archaeology and world prehistory.

Recent Term(s) Offered: spring 2021

ANTH 335    Old World Prehistory    3 Hours

A survey of prehistoric indigenous developments in the Old World, focusing on regional adaptations, representative sites and artifacts, food production and complex society, and chronologies.

Recent Term(s) Offered: None

ANTH 336    New World Prehistory    3 Hours

Survey of prehistoric indigenous developments in North, Central and South America, focusing on peopling the New World, regional adaptations, representative sites and artifacts, food production and complex society, and chronologies.

Recent Term(s) Offered: None

ANTH 340    Peoples and Cultures of Latin America    3 Hours

Study of the history and development of present cultures in Latin America with emphasis on economics, politics, religion, folklife and world view of indigenous, peasant and urban peoples.

Equivalent(s): FLK 340

Recent Term(s) Offered: summer 2019

ANTH 341    Peoples and Cultures of Asia    3 Hours

Study of the cultures of South, East, and Southeast Asia with emphasis on origins, prehistoric and historic migrations, ecology, and subsistence patterns, and the origins and evolution of the major civilizations of India, China, Japan, and Vietnam. Topics include kinship and the family, religion, social organization, gender, economy, colonialism and independence, globalization and development, and maintenance of traditions in modern contexts.

Equivalent(s): FLK 341

Recent Term(s) Offered: None

ANTH 342    Peoples and Cultures of the Caribbean    3 Hours

Examination of the variety of cultural practices found in modern-day Caribbean societies with attention to historical roots. Topics include, but are not limited to, definition of the region, religious practices, festivals, musical traditions, migration and everyday social life and conditions. Colonnade/Statewide General Education Code K-SY

Prerequisite(s): 21 hours of Foundations and Explorations Courses, or junior status

Equivalent(s): FLK 342

Recent Term(s) Offered: spring 2019; spring 2020; spring 2021

ANTH 343    Anthropology of Gender    3 Hours

A comparative study of the role gender plays in various aspects of culture. Topics include distribution of labor, environmental impact, and ideological constraints on gender constructs in a cross-cultural concept.

Recent Term(s) Offered: fall 2019; fall 2020; fall 2021

ANTH 345    Peoples and Cultures of Native North America    3 Hours

Survey of the cultures of the original peoples of North America, with emphasis on the ethnographic present.

Equivalent(s): FLK 345

Recent Term(s) Offered: None

ANTH 350    Peoples and Cultures of Africa    3 Hours

Survey of the cultures of Africa, with emphasis on historical development and contemporary cultural diversity.

Equivalent(s): AFAM 350, FLK 350

Recent Term(s) Offered: None

ANTH 360    Applied Anthropology – Understanding and Addressing Contemporary Human Problems    3 Hours

History and development of applied anthropology emphasizing identification of and solutions to social, economic, ecological, and technological problems. Colonnade/Statewide General Education Code K-SC

Prerequisite(s): 21 hours of Foundations and Explorations Courses, or junior status

Recent Term(s) Offered: fall 2019; spring 2020; fall 2020; spring 2021; fall 2021

ANTH 366    Special Topics in Anthropology    3 Hours (repeatable max of 9 hrs)

Opportunity for in-depth examination of anthropological topics of current disciplinary and student interest.

Recent Term(s) Offered: winter 2019; spring 2019; summer 2019; spring 2020

ANTH 378    Southern Appalachian Folklife    3 Hours

Folklife of southern Appalachia, as reflected in the material folk culture, in traditional folk customs and practices, legends, anecdotes, songs, language, and literature.

Equivalent(s): FLK 378

Recent Term(s) Offered: None

ANTH 382    Medical Anthropology    3 Hours

Cross-cultural examination of definitions of health and wellness, attitudes towards and cultural construction of illness, treatments for disease, and aging. Particular emphasis on examples from non-Western societies.

Recent Term(s) Offered: fall 2019

ANTH 388    Foodways    3 Hours

Exploration of the relationship between food and culture. Colonnade/Statewide General Education Code K-LG

Prerequisite(s): 21 hours of Foundations and Explorations Courses, or junior status

Equivalent(s): FLK 388

Recent Term(s) Offered: spring 2019; summer 2019; fall 2019; spring 2020; summer 2020; fall 2020; spring 2021; summer 2021; fall 2021

ANTH 395    Laboratory Practicum in Archaeology or Biological Anthropology    3 Hours (repeatable max of 9 hrs)

Practical experience in artifact accession, inventory, curation and documentation or in preparation of educational displays using archaeological and biological collections at the WKU Anthropology Lab. Graded pass-fail. Repeatable for 9 hours, 3 hours of which may count in the first 30 hours in the major or 21 hours of the minor. Note: ANTH 125 required for biological anthropology practicum, ANTH 130 required for archaeology practicum, ANTH 470/FLK 470 required for educational displays practicum, or consent of instructor. Course pass required.

Recent Term(s) Offered: spring 2019; spring 2020; fall 2020; spring 2021

ANTH 399    Field Methods in Ethnography    3 Hours

An examination of the history, theory, techniques, and ethics of ethnographic fieldwork, including practical fieldwork experience.

Equivalent(s): FLK 399

Recent Term(s) Offered: spring 2019; summer 2019; spring 2020; fall 2020; fall 2021

ANTH 400    Ethnomusicology    3 Hours

Survey of the concepts and methods of ethnomusicology. Topics include history of ethnomusicology, transcription and analysis, musicians, musical instruments, music acculturation, and the function of music in society.

Equivalent(s): FLK 400

Recent Term(s) Offered: None

ANTH 410    African-American Music    3 Hours

A survey of selected musical styles created and developed by African-Americans from the 17th to the 20th century: spirituals, blues, popular music forms (e.g. soul, reggae, rap music). Emphasis will be placed on the historical factors and sociocultural trends that influenced the development of African-American music.

Equivalent(s): FLK 410, AFAM 410

Recent Term(s) Offered: None

ANTH 432    Field Course in Archaeology    1-9 Hours (repeatable max of 9 hrs)

Includes archaeological survey, site mapping, artifact recovery, recording, and cataloging. Work is usually conducted on prehistoric Indian sites. The number of credit hours will be determined in consultation with instructor. Note: Permission of instructor may be required.

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 130

Recent Term(s) Offered: summer 2019; fall 2019; spring 2020; summer 2020; summer 2021

ANTH 434    Graveyard Archaeology    3 Hours (repeatable max of 6 hrs)

Application of archaeological methods in the documentation of historic graveyards, emphasizing legal mandates, formation processes, subsurface prospecting, remote sensing, mapping and headstone recording. Students must arrange own travel to field site(s).

Course Fee: $10

Recent Term(s) Offered: None

ANTH 436    Applied Archaeology    3 Hours

Examines contract archaeology and public archaeology within the context of cultural resource management, emphasizing legal mandates, field methods, public education programs, and ethical considerations.

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 130

Recent Term(s) Offered: None

ANTH 438    Archaeological Lab Methods    3 Hours (repeatable max of 3 hrs)

Provides practical experience in the methods and techniques for classifying and analyzing archaeological materials and interpreting the resulting data.

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 130

Recent Term(s) Offered: fall 2020

ANTH 442    Ecological and Economic Anthropology    3 Hours

Analysis of economic systems and cultural adaptations to the environment of Western and non-Western societies, with particular attention paid to the Caribbean and/or Latin America.

Recent Term(s) Offered: None

ANTH 446    Anthropology of Religion    3 Hours

A cross-cultural examination of religious beliefs and practices. Topics include myth, ritual, shamanism and healing, and the role of religion in social control and social change.

Recent Term(s) Offered: None

ANTH 448    Visual Anthropology    3 Hours

This course examines photography and film as tools and products of cross-cultural research with special emphasis on cultural and political biases presented through visual means.

Restriction(s): Students with a semester level of Freshman or Sophomore may not enroll.

Recent Term(s) Offered: fall 2019; fall 2020; fall 2021

ANTH 449    Ethnographic Video Production    3 Hours

Video production as a research methodology in anthropology. Practical exercises and collaborative student projects. Students will produce their own short ethnographic videos. Explores practices of representing cultures through video.

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 448

Recent Term(s) Offered: spring 2019; spring 2020

ANTH 450    Modern Human Biological Variation    3 Hours

Uses evolutionary theory to study biological similarities and differences among living human populations on morphological, skeletal, and molecular levels, emphasizing anthropometry, racial classification, inheritance, population genetics, adaptation, disease, and intelligence.

Prerequisite(s): (MATH 109 or MATH 116) and (ANTH 125 or BIOL 327 or BIOL 430)

Recent Term(s) Offered: None

ANTH 452    Bioarchaeology    3 Hours

The scientific study of human remains from archaeological sites and the application of biological anthropology methods and theories in archaeological research in order to reconstruct past human lifeways such as health, diet and nutrition, physical activities, mortuary practices, and social organization.

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 125 or BIOL 131

Recent Term(s) Offered: None

ANTH 470    Museum Procedures and Preservation Techniques    3 Hours

Essential aspects of museums and preservation, i.e. collecting, preserving, researching, exhibiting, and interpreting material culture.

Equivalent(s): FLK 470

Recent Term(s) Offered: spring 2020; spring 2021

ANTH 493    Archaeology Stewardship    3 Hours (repeatable max of 6 hrs)

Field monitoring, assessment, and documentation of the integrity of local archaeological sites threatened by cultural and natural formation processes. Students must arrange own travel to field sites. Note: A course pass and at least six additional hours in anthropology required.

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 130

Recent Term(s) Offered: spring 2020; fall 2020; spring 2021; fall 2021

ANTH 495    Directed Study    1-4 Hours (repeatable max of 8 hrs)

Available to superior students who wish to conduct individual, intensive reading and research in a specific area of anthropology in close cooperation with supervising faculty. Submission of such projects to student sections of regional professional meetings is encouraged. Number of credit hours will be determined in consultation with instructor. Note: Consent of department head and course pass required.

Restriction(s): Students with a semester level of Freshman or Sophomore may not enroll.

Recent Term(s) Offered: spring 2019; summer 2019; fall 2019; spring 2020; summer 2020; fall 2020; summer 2021

ANTH 499    Senior Seminar    1 Hour

Anthropological concepts and theories, current topics and developments in the discipline, anthropology careers and graduate programs, and professional ethics. To be taken in the last year of the student's program of study in anthropology. Note: 15 hours of Anthropology courses required prior to enrollment.

Prerequisite(s): ANTH 120 and ANTH 125 and ANTH 130 and ANTH 135

Restriction(s): Students with a semester level of Academy Junior, Academy Senior, Freshman or Sophomore may not enroll.

Enrollment is limited to students in Anthropology (608)

Recent Term(s) Offered: spring 2019; fall 2019; spring 2020; fall 2020; spring 2021; fall 2021

Folk Studies (FLK)

FLK 275    Supernatural Folklore    3 Hours

An investigation of traditional beliefs concerning unverifiable phenomena, including superstition, traditional healing, divination, and witchcraft. Current historical, philosophical, anthropological and folkloristic theories are covered. Colonnade/Statewide General Education Code E-AH | AH

Recent Term(s) Offered: fall 2019; spring 2020; fall 2020; spring 2021; summer 2021; fall 2021

FLK 276    Introduction to Folklore    3 Hours

An introduction to the study of folk tradition in different contexts, focusing on the concepts of folk group, cultural relativism, fieldwork, meaning and function, and the genres of folk narrative, folksong, folk custom and traditional material culture. Colonnade/Statewide General Education Code E-AH | AH

Recent Term(s) Offered: spring 2019; fall 2019; spring 2020; fall 2020; spring 2021; fall 2021

FLK 280    Cultural Diversity in the U S    3 Hours

Understanding, interpretation and appreciation of the multicultural nature of American society. Emphasis on the varieties of cultural expression, custom and world view practiced by regional, ethnic, racial and sectarian cultures. Colonnade/Statewide General Education Code K-SC

Prerequisite(s): 21 hours of Foundations and Explorations Courses, or junior status

Recent Term(s) Offered: spring 2021; fall 2021

FLK 281    Roots of Southern Culture    3 Hours

Examination of Southern folklore and folklife as part of the foundation of contemporary Southern culture.

Recent Term(s) Offered: spring 2019; spring 2020

FLK 310    Community Traditions & Global Corporate Culture    3 Hours

Multicultural study of community traditions and corporate culture in the global world.

Recent Term(s) Offered: None

FLK 330    Cultural Connections and Diversity    3 Hours

Service learning course that examines the diversity of American culture and engages students in activities to develop skills in working with a variety of cultural groups. Colonnade/Statewide General Education Code K-SC

Prerequisite(s): 21 hours of Foundations and Explorations Courses, or junior status

Recent Term(s) Offered: spring 2019

FLK 340    Peoples and Cultures of Latin America    3 Hours

Study of the history and development of present cultures in Latin America with emphasis on economics, politics, religion, folklife and world view of indigenous, peasant and urban peoples.

Equivalent(s): ANTH 340

Recent Term(s) Offered: None

FLK 341    People and Cultures of Asia    3 Hours

Study of the cultures of South, East, and Southeast Asia with emphasis on origins, prehistoric and historic migrations, ecology and subsistence patterns, and the origins and evolution of the major civilizations of India, China, Japan, and Vietnam. Topics include kinship and the family, religion, social organization, gender, economy, colonialism and independence, globalization and development, and maintenance of traditions in modern contexts.

Equivalent(s): ANTH 341

Recent Term(s) Offered: None

FLK 342    Peoples and Cultures of the Caribbean    3 Hours

Examination of the variety of cultural practices and social conditions found in modern-day Caribbean societies with attention to historical roots. Topics include, but are not limited to, definition of the region, religious practices, festivals, musical traditions, migration and everyday social life and conditions. Colonnade/Statewide General Education Code K-SY

Prerequisite(s): 21 hours of Foundations and Explorations Courses, or junior status

Equivalent(s): ANTH 342

Recent Term(s) Offered: spring 2019; spring 2020

FLK 345    People and Cultures of Native North America    3 Hours

Survey of the cultures of the original peoples of North America, with emphasis on the ethnographic present.

Equivalent(s): ANTH 345

Recent Term(s) Offered: None

FLK 350    Peoples and Cultures of Africa    3 Hours

Survey of the cultures of Africa, with emphasis on historical development and contemporary cultural diversity.

Equivalent(s): AFAM 350, ANTH 350

Recent Term(s) Offered: None

FLK 371    Urban Folklore    3 Hours

Varieties and characteristics of urban American folklore with emphasis on legends, customs, beliefs, and other lore of today's regional, occupational, and ethnic groups.

Recent Term(s) Offered: None

FLK 373    Folklore and the Media    3 Hours

Variety and characteristics of folklore in the media including newspapers, television, magazines, comics, movies, photographs, cartoons, and advertisements. Colonnade/Statewide General Education Code K-LG

Prerequisite(s): 21 hours of Foundations and Explorations Courses, or junior status

Recent Term(s) Offered: winter 2019; spring 2019; summer 2019; fall 2019; winter 2020; spring 2020; summer 2020; fall 2020; spring 2021; fall 2021

FLK 377    African-American Folklore    3 Hours

Oral, written, and material folk traditions of African-Americans, with emphasis on the United States and the Caribbean.

Equivalent(s): AFAM 377

Recent Term(s) Offered: None

FLK 378    Southern Appalachian Folklife    3 Hours

Folklife of southern Appalachia, as reflected in the material folk culture, in traditional folk customs and practices, legends, anecdotes, songs, language, and literature.

Equivalent(s): ANTH 378

Recent Term(s) Offered: None

FLK 379    Topics in Folklore    3 Hours

A consideration of special topics to acquaint students with significant problems and current issues in folklore. Content will vary from time to time according to the instructor and the needs of the students.

Recent Term(s) Offered: None

FLK 388    Foodways    3 Hours

Exploration of the relationship between food and culture. Colonnade/Statewide General Education Code K-LG

Prerequisite(s): 21 hours of Foundations and Explorations Courses, or junior status

Equivalent(s): ANTH 388

Recent Term(s) Offered: spring 2019; summer 2019; fall 2019; spring 2020; summer 2020; fall 2020; spring 2021; summer 2021; fall 2021

FLK 399    Field Methods in Ethnography    3 Hours

An examination of the history, theory, techniques, and ethics of ethnographic fieldwork, including practical fieldwork experience.

Equivalent(s): ANTH 399

Recent Term(s) Offered: spring 2019; fall 2019; spring 2020; fall 2020; fall 2021

FLK 400    Ethnomusicology    3 Hours

Survey of the concepts and methods of ethnomusicology. Topics include history of ethnomusicology, transcription and analysis, musicians, musical instruments, music acculturation, and the function of music in society.

Equivalent(s): ANTH 400

Recent Term(s) Offered: None

FLK 410    African-American Music    3 Hours

A survey of selected musical styles created and developed by African-Americans from the 17th to the 20th century: spirituals, blues, popular music forms (e.g. soul, reggae, rap music). Emphasis will be placed on the historical factors and socio-cultural trends that influenced the development of African-American music.

Equivalent(s): ANTH 410, AFAM 410

Recent Term(s) Offered: None

FLK 430    Oral History    3 Hours

Methods and theories of oral history, legal and ethical considerations, uses and planning of local oral history projects. This course requires off-campus travel.

Recent Term(s) Offered: None

FLK 434    Historic Preservation    3 Hours

An overview of historic preservation methods and practice. The course will include an overview of the historic preservation movement in the United States and an examination of preservation law and methodology. A field project is required.

Equivalent(s): GEOG 434

Recent Term(s) Offered: None

FLK 445    American Architectural History    3 Hours

An interdisciplinary survey of American architectural history, including trends and styles, architect designed and manufactured structures and elements, and the social history of American architecture.

Equivalent(s): ART 445

Recent Term(s) Offered: spring 2021

FLK 462    Folklore and Medicine    3 Hours

This course examines the role of traditional culture in shaping attitudes and behavior related to sickness, health, and healing. Institutional, alternative, and informal medical settings are discussed.

Equivalent(s): PH 462

Recent Term(s) Offered: fall 2019

FLK 464    Vernacular Architecture    3 Hours

The forms, functions, and styles of buildings constructed according to custom from local materials to meet individual and cultural preferences.

Recent Term(s) Offered: fall 2020

FLK 470    Museum Procedures and Preservation Techniques    3 Hours

Essential aspects of museums and of preservation, i.e., collecting, preserving, researching, exhibiting, and interpreting material culture.

Equivalent(s): ANTH 470

Recent Term(s) Offered: spring 2019; spring 2020; spring 2021

FLK 477    Folk Arts and Technology    3 Hours

Folklife research in selected world culture groups, with emphasis on folk crafts, technology, and architecture in the United States prior to their absorption into industrialization. Special reference to northwest European antecedents, sources, and parallels.

Recent Term(s) Offered: fall 2019; fall 2021

FLK 478    Folklore and Literature    3 Hours

Readings in world literature from the Bible to the modern novel and examination of the degree to which oral literature has affected origins and development of written literature.

Recent Term(s) Offered: spring 2020

FLK 479    Directed Independent Research in Folklore    3 Hours (repeatable max of 6 hrs)

Supervised individual study directed by a member of the Folk Studies faculty. NOTE: course pass required.

Recent Term(s) Offered: None

FLK 480    Women’s Folklife    3 Hours

The various images and roles of women in the U.S. and selected world cultures as reflected in folklife materials such as narratives, beliefs, ballads, rhymes, games, customs, and folk arts.

Recent Term(s) Offered: fall 2020

FLK 489    Internship in Folk Studies    3 Hours

Practical out-of-classroom experience in a supervised work situation with a cooperating business, industry, social or governmental agency emphasizing application of advanced knowledge and skills in folk studies. NOTE: course pass required.

Recent Term(s) Offered: summer 2021; fall 2021